Geology is the science and study of the solid and liquid matter that constitutes the Earth. The field of geology encompasses the study of the composition, structure, physical properties, dynamics, and history of Earth materials, and the processes by which they are formed, moved, and changed. The field is a major academic discipline, and is also important for mineral and hydrocarbon extraction, knowledge about and mitigation of natural hazards, some engineering fields, and understanding past climates and environments with reference to present-day climate change.

Etymology
The word "geology" was first used by Jean-André Deluc in the year 1778 and introduced as a fixed term by Horace-Bénédict de Saussure in the year 1779. The science was not included in Encyclopædia Britannica's third edition completed in 1797, but had a lengthy entry in the fourth edition completed by 1809.[1] An older meaning of the word was first used by Richard de Bury to distinguish between earthly and theological jurisprudence.

-Source: Wikipedia.

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Corpus Christi Geological Society
P.O. Box 1068
Corpus Christi, TX 78403



Coastal Bend Geophysical Society
P.O. Box 2471
Corpus Christi, TX 78403


Phase II - Bones in Schools

Phase II, Bones in Schools, expands on our Maps in Schools project by discussing the South Texas Ice Ages and distributing a 13,230 year Ice Age Mammoth bone and a framed Ice Mural, created by artist Dinah Bowman.

We have presented  138  schools with an Ice Age Mammoth Bone, a framed Ice Age Mural along with a presentation by a geologist since Oct 2009.

50  Schools had presentations and were presented an Ice Age Mammoth bone before the Framed Ice Age Murals were completed and now need the framed mural.

Click here to donate to our Public Outreach programs!

The Maps in Schools, Bones in Schools, and Boulders in Schools all plant the seeds of curiousity in children around our community.

Thank you for all of your help!


Interactive Mural - Move your mouse over the text below for larger detail of the cooresponding area described.


Download a higher resolution image of the Ice Age Mural (1024x794)



Schools that have a Mammoth Bone and Mammoth Posters in their school Trophy Case


View Bones in Schools in a larger map


Click the icon to download our CCGeo Google Earth File.

The file contains our Maps in Schools project, Bones in Schools project, Virtual Field Trips, Voyage Solar System to be installed in Corpus Christi, and Orions Belt scale markers throughout Corpus Christi.



Prehistoric America: A Journey Through the Ice Age and Beyond


Click this link or the image to purchase this DVD via Amazon.com


Click here if you subscribe to Netflix so you can add it to your Rental Queue.

This is an incredible DVD - you will want to own it - it is done by the BBC about the Great Plains of America.
It mentions most of the animlas that are on our Ice Age Mural done by Dinah Bowman.

Teachers will want to get it also - it is very, very well done, interesting, and applies to our "Bones in Schools" incredibly well.

Thanks,
Owen



Bones Presentation by Owen Hopkins at the Northwest Library:










Schools that have a Framed Ice Age Mural and Mammoth Bone in their school Trophy Case
from a presentation since September 2009
(If no date below, then the School has received a Mammoth bone in their school Trophy case
from a presentation and still need the Framed Ice Age Mural - Schools can contact the Corpus Christi Geological Society
by emailing: owengeologist@gmail.com to get a delivery time/date)

*** Click on the underlined schools for an article and/or picture about the presentation. ***

Updated: October 28, 2010
 


School Name School Type City State Framed Ice Age Mural Mural Donor
   
A.C. Jones High School High Beeville TX
AC Blunt Middle School Middle Aransas Pass TX
AC Blunt Middle School Middle Aransas Pass TX 1/25/12 Bones in Schools Grant
Adult Learning Center Public Corpus Christi TX 4/20/10 Jim Brothers
Agua Dulce Elementary School Elementary Agua Dulce TX 5/6/10 Nueces County Historical Society
Alice High School High Alice TX
Allen Elementary School Elementary Corpus Christi TX 1/29/10 Ben Gloria Meadows
Aransas Pass High School High Aransas Pass TX
Banquete Junior High Middle Banquete TX
Banquete Junior High Middle Banquete TX 1/24/12 Bones in Schools Grant
Banquette Elementary School Elementary Banquette TX 11/1/10 Bones in Schools Grant
Ben Bolt Elementary School Elementary Ben Bolt TX 12/15/10 Bones in Schools Grant
Bishop Elementary Elementary Bishop TX 2/21/11 Bones in Schools Grant
Bishop Elementary Elementary Bishop TX
Bishop Garriga Middle Middle Corpus Christi TX
Bishop Garriga Middle School Middle Corpus Christi TX 1/20/12 Bones in Schools Grant
Blance Moore Elementary Elementary Corpus Christi TX 1/20/12 Bones in Schools Grant
Blance Moore Elementary Elementary Corpus Christi TX
Blaschke Sheldon Intermediate Intermediate Ingleside TX
Blaschke Sheldon Intermediate Elementary Ingleside TX 1/25/12 Bones in Schools Grant
Blaschke Sheldon Intermediate Elementary Ingleside TX 11/15/10 Bones in Schools Grant
Blessed Sacrament School Private San Antonio TX 10/8/10 South Texas Geological Society
Brundrett Middle School Middle Port Aransas TX 11/2010
Bundret Middle School Middle Port Aransas TX
C D Fulkes Middle School Middle Round Rock TX 10/8/10 South Texas Geological Society
Calallen High School High Corpus Christi TX 5/10/10 Jeff Kirby
Calallen Middle School Middle Corpus Christi TX 5/10/10 Thomas A. Medary
Carroll High School High Corpus Christi TX 6/17/10 Coastal Bend Bays & Estuaries
Central Catholic Private Corpus Christi TX 1/14/10 Owen Hopkins
Central Catholic High School High San Antonio TX 10/8/10 Ivy Young
Cesar Chavez High High Corpus Christi TX 5/26/10 Bjoern Janke
Charlie Marshall Elementary Elementary Aransas Pass TX 11/19/10 Dropped Off - 2010 Grant
Chickasha Middle School Middle Chickasha OK Owen Hopkins
Chickasha Quality Academy Private Chickasha OK Owen Hopkins
College Prep High School High Corpus Christi TX 5/12/10 Mary Campbell
Craft Training Center Public Corpus Christi TX 5/14/10 Marty & Becky Davis
Crested Butte Community School Public Crested Butte CO 1/20/10 Sam and Rhonda Ganz
Crockett Elementary School Elementary Corpus Christi TX 6/17/10 Coastal Bend Bays & Estuaries
Dakar Senegal Middle School Middle Dakar . 10/2010
Dawson Elementary School Elementary Corpus Christi TX 9/16/10 Jon C. Spradley
Douglas Benold Middle School Middle Georgetown TX 10/8/10 South Texas Geological Society
Dr Clotide Garcia Library Library Corpus Christi TX
Driscoll Elementary School Elementary Driscoll TX 4/6/11 Bones in Schools Grant
Driscoll Middle School Middle Corpus Christi TX 5/4/10 Milan Swikert
Early Childhood Development Center Elementary Corpus Christi TX 12/11/09
East Cliff Elementary School Elementary Portland TX 9/23/10 Ed Egger
Education Service Center Public Corpus Christi TX 4/6/10 Owen Hopkins
Education Service Center Region III Public Victoria TX 10/8/10 South Texas Geological Society
Ella Barnes Elementary Elementary Corpus Christi TX 3/11/10 Atlee Tyree
Evans Elementary School Elementary Corpus Christi TX 9/8/10 Nueces County Historical Society
Fadden-McKeown-Chamblis Elementary Beeville TX
Falfurrias High School High Falfurrias TX
Fannin Elementary School Elementary Corpus Christi TX 11/4/10 Bones in Schools Grant
Faulk Early Childhood Center Elementary Aransas Pass TX 11/19/10 Dropped Off - 2010 Grant
First Baptist Church School Private Beeville TX 11/9/10 2010 Bones in School Grant
Flour Bluff Elementary School Elementary Corpus Christi TX 11/16/10 Bones in Schools Grant
Flour Bluff High High Corpus Christi TX
Flour Bluff Intermediate Intermediate Corpus Christi TX 11/6/10
FMC Elementary School Elementary Beeville TX 2/16/11 Bones in Schools Grant
Galvan Elementary School Elementary Corpus Christi TX 2/3/2010 Sam and Rhonda Ganz
Garcia Elementary School Elementary Alice TX 1/7/11 Bones in Schools Grant
Garza Gonzalez Charter Schoolc Charter Corpus Christi TX 6/17/10 Coastal Bend Bays & Estuaries
Gibson Elementary Elementary Corpus Christi TX 11/30/10 Dropped Off - 2010 Grant
Giddings Intermediate School Elementary Giddings TX 10/8/10 South Texas Geological Society
Gillett Intermediate School Elementary Kingsville TX 11/6/10
Gonzales Junior High School Middle Gonzales TX 10/8/10 South Texas Geological Society
Grand Elementary Elementary Chickasha OK Owen Hopkins
Gregory-Portland High School High Portland TX 5/3/10 Ed Egger
Gregory-Portland Intermediate School Elementary Portland TX 4/19/10 Ed Egger
Gregory-Portland Junior High Middle Portland TX
Gregory-Portland Junior High Middle Portland TX 1/25/12 Bones in Schools Grant
H. M. King High School High Kingsville TX
H.G. Olsen Elementary School Elementary Port Aransas TX 4/8/11 Bones in Schools Grant
Hamlin Middle School Middle Corpus Christi TX 11/18/2010
Harmony School of Science - Austin Private Austin TX 10/8/10 South Texas Geological Society
Hillcrest Elementary School Elementary Alice TX 1/28/11 Bones in Schools Grant
Holy Family Church Private Corpus Christi TX 6/17/10 Coastal Bend Bays & Estuaries
Housing Authority City of Corpus Christi Public Corpus Christi TX
Houston School . . . Powell Ytsmz
IWA Elemetary Elementary Corpus Christi TX 5/19/10 Frank Cornish
IWA Middle School Middle Corpus Christi TX 5/20/10 Bill Maxwell
IWA Secondary High Corpus Christi TX 5/17/10 Rick Paige
Janet Harte Library Library Corpus Christi TX
Jefferson Middle School Middle San Antonio TX 10/8/10 South Texas Geological Society
Jensen Elementary School Elementary Pasadena TX
Jim Barnes Middle School Middle Seguin TX 10/8/10 South Texas Geological Society
John Paul II High School High Corpus Christi TX 12/2/09 Bernard Paulson
Kaffie Middle School Middle Corpus Christi TX 3/11/10 Dan Pedrotti
Kendall Elementary Elementary Boerne TX
Kieberger Elementary Elementary Aransas Pass TX 11/22/10 Dropped Off - 2010 Grant
Kostoryz Elementary Elementary Corpus Christi TX 4/1/10 Bjoern Janke
Lamar Elementary School Elementary Corpus Christi TX 3/2/10 Maxine Fluornoy
Lasara ISD Public Lasara TX 6/17/10 Coastal Bend Bays & Estuaries
Laser School Alternative Kingsville TX
Laser School Alternative Kingsville TX
Leander Middle School Middle Leander TX 1/22/10 Tony Moherek
Lexington Elementary School Elementary Corpus Christi TX 12/14/09 Gloria Hicks
Liberty Hill Junior High School Middle Liberty Hill TX 10/8/10 South Texas Geological Society
Lincoln Elementary School Elementary Chickasha OK Owen Hopkins
Luther Jones Elementary Elementary Corpus Christi TX 4/8/11 Bones in Schools Grant
Marble Falls High School High Marble Falls TX 1/14/10 John Griesbach
Mary Grett School Special Campus School Elementary Corpus Christi TX 3/23/10 Bob Rice
Mathis Elementary School Elementary Mathis TX 2/3/11 Bones in Schools Grant
Mathis Intermediate School Elementary Mathis TX 1/24/12 Bones in Schools Grant
Mathis Middle School Middle Mathis TX 1/24/12 Bones in Schools Grant
McCraw Junior High Middle Mathis TX 1/24/12 Bones in Schools Grant
McCraw Junior High Middle Mathis TX
Mi Casita Montesorri School Private Corpus Christi TX 1/13/10 Owen Hopkins
Mireles Elementary School Elementary Corpus Christi TX 9/22/10 Charles R. Noll, Jr.
Neyland Library Library Corpus Christi TX
Noonan Elementary School Elementary Alice TX 1/13/11 Bones in Schools Grant
Norman Thomas Elementary School Elementary Freer TX 2/1/11 Bones in Schools Grant
Norman Thomas Elementary School Elementary Freer TX
Northwest Branch Library Library Corpus Christi TX 10/17/09 Owen Hopkins
Oak Park Elementary Elementary Corpus Christi TX 11/6/10
Orange Grove Junior High Middle Orange Grove TX
Orange Grove Junior High Middle Orange Grove TX 1/24/12 Bones in Schools Grant
Orange Grove Junior High School Middle Orange Grove TX 11/6/10
Our Father's House Private Sandia TX
Our Father's House Private Sandia TX 1/24/12 Bones in Schools Grant
Our Lady of Perpetual Help Private Corpus Christi TX 5/17/10 Jeff Sizemore
Palito Blanco Elementary School Elementary Ben Bolt TX 11/29/10 Dropped Off - 2010 Grant
Petronila Elementary School Elementary Robstown TX
Petronila Elementary School Elementary Robstown TX 12/15/10 Bones in Schools Grant
Pettus Elementary School Elementary Pettus TX 2/8/11 Bones in Schools Grant
Pettus High School High Pettus TX
Pioneer Elementary School Elementary Chickasha OK Owen Hopkins
Portland Oregon High School High Portland OR 10/2010
Poth High School High Poth TX 6/17/10 Coastal Bend Bays & Estuaries
Prescott Elementary School Elementary Corpus Christi TX 11/30/10 Dropped Off - 2010 Grant
Ramirez Elementary School Elementary Realitos TX 4/2011
Ray High School High Corpus Christi TX 3/11/10 Mike Lucente
Refugio High School High Refugio TX
Ricardo Elementary School Elementary Kingsville TX 2/17/11 Bones in Schools Grant
Rockport Lockhart . Rockport TX 5/2/11 Bones in Schools Grant
Rockport-Fulton High School High Rockport TX
Saenz Elementary School Elementary Alice TX 1/20/11 Bones in Schools Grant
Saint Phillip of Jesus Catholic School Private San Antonio TX 10/8/10 South Texas Geological Society
Salazar Elementary School Elementary Alice TX 1/21/11 Bones in Schools Grant
San Diego High School High San Diego TX
San Pedro Elementary Elementary Robstown TX 2/9/11 Bones in Schools Grant
Sanders Elementary Elementary Corpus Christi TX 3/9/10 Maxine Fluornoy
Santa Gertrudis Elementary School Elementary Kingsville TX 4/8/10 Milan Swikert
Schallert Elementary School Elementary Alice TX 1/17/11 Bones in Schools Grant
Schanen Elementary School Elementary Corpus Christi TX 4/28/10 Atlee Tyree
School of Science and Technology Charter Corpus Christi TX 5/9/10 Dennis Moore & Lauren Blanchard
Seashore Elementary Learning Center Charter Corpus Christi TX 3/24/10 Chris Tutt
Seashore Middle Academy Charter Corpus Christi TX 3/24/10 Craig Mullenax
Shaw Elementary Elementary Corpus Christi TX 1/12/10 Atlee Tyree
Sinton High School High Sinton TX
Smith Elementary School Elementary Corpus Christi TX 11/30/10 Dropped Off - 2010 Grant
South Park Middle Middle Corpus Christi TX
South Park Middle School Middle Corpus Christi TX 1/20/12 Bones in Schools Grant
SouthWest Elementary School Elementary Chickasha OK Owen Hopkins
SS. Cyril & Methodius School Private Corpus Christi TX 5/26/10 Jeff Autrey
St Philips Episcopal School Private Beeville TX 11/9/10 2010 Bones in School Grant
St. James Elementary Private Corpus Christi TX 1/20/12 Bones in Schools Grant
St. James Intermediate Private Corpus Christi TX 1/20/12 Bones in Schools Grant
St. Leo the Great Catholic Church Private San Antonio TX 10/8/10 South Texas Geological Society
St. Mary's Academy Private Beeville TX
St. Mary's Academy Private Beeville TX 4/6/11 Bones in Schools Grant
Stephen F. Austin Elementary Elementary Gregory TX 12/11/09 Stephen Thomas
Student Learning and Guidance Center Public Corpus Christi TX 6/17/10 Coastal Bend Bays & Estuaries
T.M. Clark Elementary Elementary Portland TX 9/28/10 Ed Egger
Texas A&M Corpus Christi University Corpus Christi TX 6/17/10 Coastal Bend Bays & Estuaries
Texas A&M Galveston University Galveston TX 12/16/09 Owen Hopkins
Texas A&M Kingsville University Kingsville TX 2/16/10 Owen Hopkins
Tom Browne Middle School Middle Corpus Christi TX 6/17/10 Coastal Bend Bays & Estuaries
Travis Elementary School Elementary Corpus Christi TX 11/13/09 Owen Hopkins
Tuloso-Midway High School High Corpus Christi TX
Tuloso-Midway Int. Middle Corpus Christi TX
Tuloso-Midway Middle School Middle Corpus Christi TX 1/23/12 Bones in Schools Grant
University of Science & Arts of Oklahoma University Chickasha OK 9/7/10 Owen Hopkins
University of Texas - San Antonio University San Antonio TX 6/17/10 Coastal Bend Bays & Estuaries
Waco Mammoth Site Public Waco TX 4/19/10 Stalker Energy, LP
Welder Elementary Elementary Sinton TX
West Oso Elementary Elementary Corpus Christi TX 10/29/10
WildCat Learning Center Public Portland TX
Wilson Elementary School Elementary Houston TX 05/2010 Mike Bertness
Windsor Park Elementary Elementary Corpus Christi TX 10/28/09 Owen Hopkins
Woodlawn Elementary Elementary Corpus Christi TX
Woodridge Elementary School Elementary San Antonio TX 12/2/10 Harry Balling
Woodsboro Junor High School Middle Woodsboro TX
Wright's Materials Private Robstown TX 12/18/09 Owen Hopkins
Yaxche School Private Taos NM
Yeager Elementary School Elementary Corpus Christi TX 1/19/11 Bones in Schools Grant
YMCA Public Corpus Christi TX
Zavala SES Elementary School Elementary Corpus Christi TX 1/5/10 Nueces County Historical Society
Teachers, if you are interested in requesting a Bones in Schools presentation, please fill out the form below and Owen Hopkins will contact you; we will have a geologist make a presentation of the Framed Ice Age Mural, give the school a large mammoth bone, give you posters for teacher use, give Ice Age Activity Books to each teacher with a 3rd, 4th and 5th grade curriculum based on the September 2010 TEKS is provided on CD and a 3-ring Binder, and give a 45 minute South Texas Geology presentation with each student receiving a mineral sample - all at NO CHARGE!

This project is supported by the Corpus Christi Geological Society, Coastal Bend Geophysical Society, and Society of Professional Independent Earth Scientists.

Teacher's Name:
School:
Phone Number:
E-Mail Address:
Comments:
     


Bones Presentation by Ronny Thomas:

Education Service Center

(Click Image to Watch Video)





Part I


Part II




CCGS Proclomation



Mammuthus (Manny) Manfred aka Manny (mammoth)
Synocnus (Sid) Sid (ground sloth)
Smilodon (Diego) Diego (saber-toothed cat)


Bones from extinct Ice Age (Pleistocene) mammals that roamed south of the glaciers and ranged from California to Arizona to New Mexico to Texas to Florida animals have been discovered in Nueces County and are displayed in local Museums. Global warming started 18,000 years ago!

Bones calculated to be 13,000 years old are found 40 feet below the surface of the Nueces River Floodplain in Nueces County.



These animals also used to live in southern US and became extinct about 11,000 B.C.




December 2008

Thank you letters from students... After a Maps in School Bones in Schools Presentation
Southwest Elementary in Chickasha, Oklahoma 4th and 5th graders


I learned about Global Warming. Thank you for the Mammoth tooth for our school—it was huge.

Conner



I would like to be a scientist. I would really love that.

Ceara



Thanks for teaching us about bones and donating a lot of cool stuff! Now all 4th and 5th graders at Southwest know about fossils.

Kaitlyn



I want you to know I loved Learning about Geology and I learned a lot. Geology is Study of Earth—Learn it! Thanks for giving my school the fosil!

Dakota



The volcano is young. That yellow is young. The gooble warming started 2 million year ago. 2 miles of ice.

Brayden



I really liked it when you taught us the 2 latin words ‘Geo’ and ‘ology’ that was really cool. And I did not know that global warming started 20,000 years ago.

Deidra



My favorite part was lerning about the Wooley Mammth Tooth.

Meghan



It was interesting. I liked the part about the ice and that it kept coming downward. Also thank you for the half of the mammoth tooth

Allison



I like it when you talk about the Ice Ages

Cheuvu



I learned so much. I don’t know the mammoth bone is 13,230 years old.

Emilea



The map that you gave us is really cool.

Sarah



Thanks for coming to our school. I had fun taking notes-it was important.

Jessie



I learned a lot about geologists and what they do.

Serena



Maybe one of them will want to become a geologist someday, now that they know this is a profession out there.

Angie Morgan 5th grade teacher



I gave a framed Geologic map, a mammoth tooth and two mammoth posters to my hometown school. YOU CAN TOO. SHIP SOME MAPS TO YOUR SCHOOL AND NEXT TIME YOU ARE THERE—CALL THE ASSISTANT PRINCIPAL AND ASK TO GIVE THEM A MAP. CALL me and come get a mammoth bone/poster for your hometown.

Owen Hopkins 11/19/08




Back row, left to right: teachers Don Linsteadt and Manuel Lopez, Dr. Rick Ford-Assistant Director, Dr. Anne Matula-Director, 4 Craft Training Center high school welding students and CCGS VP Rick Paige on the far right.

The above pictured students are in Class II welding class at the Craft Training Center in Corpus Christi. They will be designing bone stands to take back to their home school districts along with an extinct mammal bone. These students were very interested in the bones we brought with us, and they are looking forward to being a part of the process of distributing the TAMU-Kingsville donated bones to area schools. They were very proud to be able to take the bone stand and posters to their own schools. It gives them some ownership in this project and gives them something very special and unique to show to their classmates, teachers and principals at their own school.

Their curiosity and excitement is what the CCGS wants to spread all around the Coastal Bend. We want to “Plant the Seeds of Geologic Curiosity” to get students to think, investigate, discuss and see how interesting the world is around them—to get them to WANT to finish high school and WANT to go to college. We are achieving our goal by planting the ‘seeds’ of framed US Geologic Maps and Ice Age animal bones in all of our area schools. These ‘seeds’ will be in schools for many years to come, and we are proud that the Craft Training Center students will be a part of this community process.


The bone stand on the left was designed and welded jointly by Jeremy Rodriguez, Ricardo Gaitan and Michael Dodge of Mathis High School at the Craft Training Center of the Coastal Bend. The bone stand on the right was done by Andrew Torres and John Rodriguez of Gregory-Portland High School.

Our stated goal is for the Craft Training Center High School welding students to select a bone, design a stand, weld the stand, paint and prep the stand. The stands will be signed/initialed by the welding student. Dr. Jon Baskin or Ronny Thomas will be invited to the CTC to help the students identify their bones. Then the welding students will take the bone, stand and posters back to their schools and present it to a school of their choice. This material will be displayed in a Trophy Case (might have to slid some of sports trophies over a bit) for students, parents and teachers to see for years to come.

The teachers then will have an opportunity to attend a Bones in School Workshop on January 17th at the Education Service Center in Corpus Christi to learn more details about the incredible diversity of mammal bones found in Nueces County—the La Brean fauna found here are as diverse and the ones found at the La Brea Tar Pit in Los Angeles.

This is a project combining the Arts and the Sciences. Funding contributions coming from Texas A&M Kingsville Department of Biology, Corpus Christi Geological Society, Coastal Bend Geophysical Society, Craft Training Center, Education Service Center Region 2 and two local welding supply companies that supplied the materials—Industrial Piping & Steel and Champion Welding.

Owen Hopkins
10/20/08




The CCGS Education Phase II was approved by the CCGS Executive Committee at a board meeting held on January 23, 2008. Part of the new program includes the funding to commission “Dinah Bowman, local artist, to paint a 3.5 by 7 foot mural of a snapshot of the Nueces Bay Floodplain 13,000 years ago that would include extinct and non-extinct species.” A 14 by 7 foot enlargement of the mural will be installed at the Northwest Branch Library in Corpus Christi, Texas. The board approved $30,000 for the mural and its installation. The mural will then be made into posters to be given to schools along with bone samples from the same time period that will be provided by Dr Jon Baskin and Ronnie Thomas from TAMU-Kingsville.

Jeff Cobbs, President and Sebastian Wiedmann, Treasurer made a presentation to the Northwest Branch Library on February 24, 2008 telling the 660 invited guests about the CCGS funding of the mural and its importance to Corpus Christi.

The picture at top right is Swan Lake in Ingleside where 42 extinct species were discovered in 1940 and shipped to Univ. of Texas in Austin. The shelves show 250 mammoth teeth collected by TAMU-Kingsville. The mammoth picture is a portion of the fresco mural in the Peabody Museum on the Yale University campus of the Ice Age in the Northeast. (ours will be better because it will include non-extinct species)


May 2007

Thank you letters from students... After a Maps in School and Safari In S. Texas Presentation


You made it sound fun to be a geologist so when I go to high school I will graduate and take classes for geology at the University of Texas. Thanks for giving us the TigerEye stones

Freddie



Last night when we were eating dinner my mom said “can you give me the salt” and I said “don’t say salt anymore—they are rocks”. I told her that plastic is made from oil.

Elias



I liked when you said that copper is green and halite is salt. Now that you told me that, I feel great! Thanks for the bones and the map. (the bones are Phase II-Safari in south Texas.)

Alejandro



I want to learn about snakes and more about reptiles and volcanoes. I learned that we eat rocks every day. I learned that a Mammoth tooth was from the Ice Age.

Giovanni



It was really awesome that you showed us about the glacier and how long and tall a glaicer can go and how really cold a glacier can be. I also want to thank you for the map you gave us where you told us about the glacier and also for the mamoth tooth you gave to the whole school. (Wrights Brothers Gravel Pit and Quarry requires that we give the samples to the schools—and the students and the schools really appreciate them)

Erik



Is you’r life as a gialegust affects you personally? When I grow up I whant to be like you

Sencirally:Jason (phonetic spelling is OK)



I realize that science ain’t just boring and about old thing. I like it when you taugh us aboud Dago and Many (Phase II-Safari in S Texas—I tell them that the characters in the recent movie ICE AGE of Manny the Mammoth, Diego the Sabertooth cat and Sid the Sloth really lived in South Texas). Also when you told us about how your failing and how you got help-- it made (me) realize that I can do something better in my life because I’m failing science.

Tony



Thank you for giving us something more valuble than money or gold—thanks for your time.

David



I couldn’t believe that mammoths usto live her on campus.

Destiny



One interesting thing that you told us that I enjoyed is that 18,000 years ago Global warming began. Another interesting thins is when you told us that 11,000 years ago Manny, Diego and Sid lived in Texas (this is Phase II-Safari in South Texas—the kids like to hear and remember this stuff)
Maria

… the part that was the worst was when we had to go to lunch—that was a big bumer

Gabriella



May 2007









I am very excited that the 11th annual Family Fossil Hunt is again scheduled this year at the Wright Brothers’ Gravel Pit and Quarry. This is a tremendous opportunity for students, parents and geologists to find bones of a diverse number of extinct Pleistocene mammals in our own county. The species diversity of fauna compares to the La Brea Tar Pit in Los Angeles---the same animals they find there, we find here and all are referred to as the La Brea Fauna.

So come out on May 19th and see what everyone finds at the pit—see why I am so excited about my Phase II— Safari in South Texas. One of these bones, a drawing of the skeleton of the animal, an artist’s rendition of the animal and a paleographic map of the Nueces River 11,000 years ago need to be in the Trophy cases of each school in the Coastal Bend. Come out and be a part of a Safari in South Texas. Dr Jon Baskin and Mr Ronnie Thomas of TAMU-Kingsville will be on hand to identify the discoveries.



Susan and I were in Las Vegas the weekend before the AAPG convention in Long Beach and we asked a cab driver to take us to the Nevada State Museum in Las Vegas—it is not a usual tourist destination. It was spectacular—I would like to have something like this in Corpus Christi. The picture above is of a cast of a Mammoth along with a mural of the Las Vegas area during the Ice Age. These same animals lived in Corpus Christi. It was exciting to walk under the creature and really experience its size because when you tell a student that these animals were 16 feet tall, it is hard to imagine how big they are. This is a cast, but I saw a complete authentic skeleton for sale at the Tuscon Gem and Mineral Show for $300,000 delivered and setup.

I retired from active oil and gas management at Suemaur Exploration—but find out what I have learned about retirement in my continuing saga of the oil business in Lessons Learned.

Owen Hopkins
President Corpus Christi Geological Society
ccgeo.org     4/16/07 rev



April 2007









Phase I - Fifty-one USGS Time and Terrain Geologic Maps of the US are on the walls of local schools thanks to the efforts and donations from many members of our society. The goal of getting 100 of them placed by the end of this school year is on track.

Phase II - Safari it South Texas has started with donations of extinct Pleistocene mammal bones (collected by Ronnie Thomas TAMUK and me in December) to Ella Barnes Elementary and to Kostoryz Elementary during Public School Week March 5th to March 9th. A flyer about the movie Ice Age has been prepared that indicates that the animals depicted in that movie lived in south Texas and our fossil assemblages here are similar to those from the La Brea tar pits in California.



Owen Hopkins
3/10/07



March 2007









The Phase I--Maps in School Project 2006-2007 to place the USGS Time and Terrain Geologic Map of the US in 100 schools in the Coastal Bend before the end of this school year is on track.

The Phase II--Safari in South Texas
Texas A&M University Kingsville (TAMU-K) has collected bones from more than 20 species of extinct animals from a gravel pit just west of Corpus Christi over the past 16 years. The diversity of animals rivals that from the La Brea tar pit fauna and also of the Anza-Borrego fauna in California. The plan is to prepare a permanent display for each middle school that contains:
1- large, actual bone from an extinct mammal that was collected in Nueces, County
2- drawing of the skeleton of the extinct animal with the displayed bone highlighted
3- artists drawing of what the animal looked like when alive with reference scale
4- a map showing the Nueces River flood plain as it looked 18,000 years ago
5- an artists rendition of the Corpus Christi Bay “Serengeti Plain” showing the diverse
flora and fauna

This plan includes cooperation of the TAMU-K and the Corpus Christi Geological Society. We had this incredible diversity of animals and we think all the students in our area should be aware of this. The Corpus Christi Museum of Science and History is in the process of changing its emphasis and being renamed the Corpus Christi Museum of History—so all the more reason to get these displays in the schools because they won’t get it in our local museum.

Funding for a project like this will be considerably more than for Phase I, but I think it is worthwhile. And like Win Sexton has always said, “good ideas will get drilled”—so I am hopeful this will get drilled also. I have been in contact with two foundations that have suggested that we submit a written proposal—should be done by April. And I am attending an AAPG leadership conference in Tulsa with other society presidents where I hope to get some ideas. And I would like input from the membership on any ideas or comments or suggestions.

Owen Hopkins 2/08/07
Picture at the top was taken at Sal de Atacama in the Atacama desert in northern Chile—this 1300 square mile closed salt field is 7500’ above sea level. A smoldering, 18,334’ Lascar Andes volcano is in the background.



Article from Corpus Beat:


MATH & SCIENCE: U.S. VS. WORLD

Cinda Alvarado - Magazine Editor
Posted 8/13/2007 at 3:47 PM


  PUBLICATION COVER
On the Summer 2007 feature:

All my student life, as far back as grade school, my least favorite subject was math, followed by science. The closest I got to being excited about science was watching an animated History Channel special about dinosaurs. And in college, one of my favorite aspects to majoring in journalism was that my degree plan required only one math class.

A lack of interest and naive belief that I’ll never need math and science as an adult resulted in merely doing the minimum in those subjects to get by. Of course, I’m kicking myself for it now — as I am currently re-learning basic math skills to help improve my GRE scores for a doctoral degree.

In this issue CorpusBeat examines challenges local educators have in advancing their students in math and science, plans to move their schools forward in these subjects and why this is so important both nationally and in South Texas. In a 2005 mathematics assessment administered to students in 15 countries, 11 outperformed the U.S., and four scored similarly. None scored significantly below the U.S., according to the National Academies, Advisors to the Nation on Science, Engineering and Medicine.

When I spoke with semi-retired geologist Owen Hopkins I was taken aback by his enthusiasm and passion about science. In examining this issue I heard some innovative and creative ideas about how local schools can improve math and science education, but it is Owen that comes to mind.

“Next year, my goal is to put bones in schools,” he says. “There is a gravel pit west of town and they occasionally find these amazing bones, mammoth teeth the size of a loaf of bread. And get this, mammoth only have four teeth and they have found hundreds of mammoth teeth in that pit. Do you know what that means? Those animals used to live in Texas!

“When I go to schools and talk about this topic I bring a picture of the cartoon Ice Age — the mammoth, sloth, and saber tooth cat — all of those bones are found in the pit in Corpus Christi! The people who own the pit, the Wrights, they allow bones to be taken out and given away to schools. We give two or three bones per school when we make a visit.

“My brainstorm — I want to put an actual bone or tooth or claw of some animal we found in Corpus Christi in the trophy cases of the schools. I want to put a picture of a skeleton, highlight the bone in the case, and then maybe another picture of what the animal looked like in real life, then a paleo geographic map. Paleo means old, geo means earth and graph is a map, so what Corpus Christi looked like 11,000 years ago.

“We display sports awards in school trophy cases, let’s put some science too. Students will stop, look, wonder and be curious.”

If only more local scientists, chemists, engineers, mathematicians, industry leaders and educators could get students as curious and excited about math, science and technology as Owen Hopkins does, imagine how that could influence the futures of our adolescents.

Credit: Cinda Alvarado - Magazine Editor
MATH & SCIENCE: U.S. VS. WORLD

Copyright (c) 2007 CorpusBeat


Article from Reuters Top News Stories:


Mammoth skeleton found nearly intact in Los Angeles
Wed Feb 18, 2009
By Dan Whitcomb

http://www.reuters.com/article/scienceNews/idUSTRE51H7R220090218

LOS ANGELES (Reuters) - The nearly complete skeleton of a massive Columbian mammoth who died during the last ice age has been dug out of a construction site near the La Brea Tar Pits in downtown Los Angeles, a remarkable find even in the fossil-rich area, scientists said Wednesday.

The mammoth, dubbed "Zed" by researchers at the Page Museum at the La Brea Tar Pits, likely died in his late 40s some 40,000 years ago and was found near an unprecedented treasure trove of fossils that workers stumbled upon while digging the foundation for an underground parking garage.

"What makes this so special, so exciting for us is that Zed is a complete specimen," laboratory supervisor Shelley Cox said while showing off his dirt-encrusted, dinner table-sized brown pelvic bone for reporters.

"And he's really big compared to the mammoths we've recovered from La Brea before," Cox said. "The tusks are considerably larger than anything we had expected."

The Columbian mammoth was a species of elephant that became extinct near the end of the last ice age.

Included in the cache of fossils were some 700 specimens, including a large prehistoric American Lion skull, lion bones, bones from dire wolves, saber-toothed cats, juvenile horse and bison, teratorn, coyotes, lynx and ground sloths.

The discovery is expected to double the size of the museum's collection.

Though the La Brea Tar Pits, in the city's mid-Wilshire district, are the site of the richest ice age deposits in the world, many fossils pulled out of the dirt and asphalt-like muck are jumbled with other bones. Mammoths are a rare find.

Like all animals discovered at the site, Zed became stuck in a tar pit along a river bed and ultimately died of exhaustion or starvation.

Researchers believe his skeleton remained largely intact because soon after he died he was washed away by a flood and then covered by enough sediment, sand and debris to keep predators from making off with parts of the carcass.

They estimate his skeleton is 80 percent complete, missing only a hind leg and a vertebrae. While most mammoth tusks, which are made up of fragile material called dentine, are only found in small chunks, Zed's are intact and a remarkable 10-feet long.

Examination of Zed's bones shows he was between 47 and 49 years old, suffered from arthritis and had broken three ribs during his lifetime, possibly in fights with other mammoths.

Carbon dating is expected to show he lived between 38,000 and 42,000 years ago and had long lain under a department store parking garage.

 


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